Tag Archives: Cardon Children’s

Bike safety rodeo this Saturday, March 31

Every three days a child in the United States is killed while riding a bicycle. Every single day, 100 children are treated in emergency rooms for bicycle-related head injuries.

Proper helmet use reduces the risk of brain injury from these accidents by about 90 percent.

Why don’t more kids wear helmets? For some, it’s the cool factor. For others, it’s the expense.

This weekend, Cardon Children’s Medical Center along with Safe Kids Maricopa County will give away free helmets to the first 300 people to attend their Bike Rodeo.

It’s a chance to practice bike safety skills and to find out more about helmet use. Plus, there’s an opportunity to win a new bike.

More on how to fit a bike helmet

Cardon Children’s Bike Rodeo details:

  • Saturday, March 31
  • 9 a.m. to noon
  • Cardon Children’s Medical Center
  • 1400 S. Dobson Road, Mesa 85202
  • For ages 3-16
  • Bring your bike or scooter

Watch  injury prevention specialist Tracey Fejt, RN, of Cardon Children’s talk about an outreach program she designed that provides safety curriculum and free helmets to schools that agree to “helmet required” policies for students.

Coping with dementia: a workshop for kids and families

It’s tough to deliver the news that a beloved grandparent has Alzheimer’s disease. But no one ever expects to have to tell his or her own children that a parent has been diagnosed with dementia.

But it happens.

About 10% of people under 65 will have a dementia, says Jan Dougherty, RN, director of Family and Community Services for Banner Alzheimer’s Institute.

More on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia

With the number of parents having children over 40, adds Dougherty, chances are that if a parent does develop early onset dementia, they may have adolescents or teens in the home.

No matter if it is a parent or a grandparent, kids are embarrassed by the changes they are seeing, says Dougherty, so finding others who are in similar situations can be very helpful.  Children and adults can become easily overwhelmed by the disruption that a dementia diagnosis can cause.

It’s important for parents and caregivers to be open and honest with children in any situation where rapid and significant change, such as memory loss, is likely to occur, says Cardon Children’s Child Life Specialist Courtney Kissel. That helps to maintain a trusting relationship.

Explaining a diagnosis to younger children about a parent- or a grandparent – can be a challenge.

One of the tips Kissel recommends is to ask the child to picture the memories that the person has in list form, written on a chalkboard that will, over time, be erased. The more recent memories at the top of the chalkboard will disappear first, and the memories from the early years of life at the bottom of the chalkboard will be the last to fade away.


A workshop, sponsored by the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, aims to help families to come together to learn more about dementia and how to cope with the changes.

Dougherty hopes that her team will identify some ways to keep kids and families connected on an ongoing basis –so they won’t feel alone.

Kids, Families and Dementia Workshop
Saturday, March 31
8:30am-12:30pm
Franciscan Renewal Center, 5802 E. Lincoln Drive, Scottsdale, AZ

Families participating in this workshop with their children will gain age-appropriate information about Alzheimer’s disease/related dementias, explore methods to provide age-appropriate support for kids living with a person with dementia, identify ways for adults and children to stay connected to the person with dementia, join with others in like situations and explore ongoing ways to stay connected and supported.

Cost:
Individual: $10
Family of 3 or more: $25

TO REGISTER:
Pre-registration is required for the conference. The deadline is March 26. Call: 602-839-6850 or email deidra.colvin@bannerhealth.com.

Additional information, including the workshop schedule of activities.

Car seat safety check this Saturday

Wondering if your car seat still fits your child? Confused about when to turn your child from rear-facing to front facing? Need the eye of a trained professional car seat fitter to make sure your safety system works the way it should?

On Saturday, March 24, the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety Car Seat Check Event takes place at the Target store located at  1525 W. Power Road in Mesa.

Cardon Children’s Medical Center Safety and Injury Prevention staff will have 100 car seats to give out to families who need one.

Four out of five car seats are used incorrectly, according to the American Automobile Association. Don’t make these tragic mistakes!

Families can have a child’s car seat recertified, learn how to install a seat correctly or get a free car seat.

More RAK Resources on vehicle safety seats

Watch this video to see what a safety check event looks like:

 

Snoring linked to behavior problems in children

Children who snore or who have other sleep-related breathing problems are more likely to have behavioral problems years later, says a new study to be published in the April 2012 issue of Pediatrics.

Researchers asked a group of parents about their children’s snoring, mouth breathing, observed apnea and behavior, starting at age 6 months and then periodically until age 7 years.

By age 4, the children with sleep-disordered breathing were 20 percent to 60 percent more likely to have behavioral difficulties. By age 7, the likelihood jumped to 40 to 100 percent.

The worst symptoms were associated with the worst behavioral outcomes, meaning that the kids who faced more serious sleep-related breathing problems also tended to be more likely to struggle with behavior issues.

Study authors conclude that sleep-disordered breathing early in life can have a strong effect on behavior later in childhood.

Kids who have these difficulties may miss out on critical periods of brain development that researchers believe take place during deep sleep.

The study findings suggest that these symptoms may require attention as early as the first year of life.

Dr. Mark Brown, pediatric pulmonologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, and a member of the Arizona Chapter of the AAP, weighs in on kids and snoring:

 When should a parent be concerned about snoring?

  •  When a child can be heard snoring outside of their room.
  • When a child has disrupted sleep with short “pauses, snorts, or gasps” in their sleep.
  • If the child is having behavioral problems, a short attention span and problems at school.
  • If the child, especially an older child, frequently falls asleep during the day (i.e. in the car, during a TV show or movie, while reading).
  • In severe cases, there can be difficulty with weight gain or obesity, or high blood pressure.

Is a little light snoring okay?

Light snoring without any of the above associated signs/symptoms may be “normal.” If there is any concern, the parent should consult with their child’s primary care physician.

How do you know when snoring needs medical attention?

 If any of the above signs/symptoms are seen or if the parent is unsure about the significance of their child’s snoring they should consult with their child’s primary care physician.

RAK Archives: More on the consequences of too little sleep, and what families can do about it.

RAK Resources on respiratory issues: Take a Deep Breath by Dr. Nina Shapiro

Find out what technicians at the Sleep Center at Cardon Children’s Medical Center learn by watching children sleep:


First Friday art show features work of Cardon Children’s patients

For young hospitalized patients, a chance to color, paint or draw can be a powerful tool.

As a Child Life assistant at Cardon Children’s Medical Center, Julie Anich works with kids in the art room on a regular basis.

Maria, age 8

“I really feel that the art, no matter what the diagnosis, is very relaxing for them. It’s like magic, in a sense – art is always an escape where kids could go to a place other than a hospital room and be a normal kid, even if it is just for an hour.”

 

Karla, age 8

Young Arts Arizona Ltd., will publicly exhibit the artwork of hospitalized kids from Cardon Children’s beginning this Friday, March 2, at the Purple Space gallery in downtown Phoenix.

Dena, age 10

The exhibit will also feature art created by children who are at risk due to learning challenges, economic conditions or difficult family circumstances.

Young Arts collaborates with 56 schools and agencies whose children create the art that is exhibited in publicly accessible buildings. For organizations with no art program in place, Young Arts conducts art workshops with a qualified teaching artist.

Amber, age 12

The community outreach that Young Arts strives to do is extensive; they exhibit children’s art in 24 public galleries all over Metro Phoenix and in Tucson, making art widely accessible to a huge audience.  More than 12 million people have seen over 16,000 pieces of children’s art since Young Arts’ inception in 1999.

The exhibit is open to the public but if you want to attend the gallery dedication, an RSVP is recommended.

Details:

The Art of Healing

Friday, March 2, 5:30-7 PM  at Purple Space Gallery, 2009 N 7th Street, Phoenix

Young Arts Arizona will dedicate the hall gallery at Purple Space to Valley philanthropist L. Roy Papp. Refreshments will be served.

The Purple Space Gallery is on the First Friday shuttle route.

RSVP for the dedication: 602-852-3605 or youngartsaz@gmail.com

Hearing loss in newborns and toddlers: when to worry

According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, approximately 300 newborns each year in the state have an inherited disorder that could be identified through screening.

Hearing loss is the most common of these disorders.

Babies born in hospitals are screened for hearing loss within the first few hours after birth.

Watch a newborn hearing screening at Cardon Children’s Medical Center/Banner Desert Medical Center

If a baby doesn’t pass the initial test, parents need to make sure they return for a repeat screening two to four weeks later, says Patty Shappell, AuD., CCC-A, an audiologist with Neonatology Associates, Ltd.

“Parents may get home and think the baby is responding normally, says Shappell, “but they still need to have a follow-up evaluation to assess hearing and rule out even mild or unilateral hearing loss.”

What happens if screening results are not within the normal range? Read about Brooke Gammie’s journey after her daughter, Payton, did not pass her newborn hearing screening.

For babies born outside of a hospital, screenings are available at outpatient clinics such as Neonatal Associates. Most insurance companies, including AHCCCS, cover the costs of the screenings.

What do babies miss if they are born with even a mild hearing loss? Hearing acuity directly affects the development of speech and verbal language skills. A baby with hearing loss, even during the first year, can be short-changed in his or her social, emotional, cognitive and academic development.

Diagnosis and early intervention are critical during the first year for the child with any degree of loss.

 How do you know if your baby is at risk for hearing loss?

Risk factors for hearing loss, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services include:

  • Babies who stay in the NICU for more than 5 days
  • Babies who have had an infection before or after birth such as CMV, herpes, rubella or meningitis
  • Babies who have a family member with hearing loss from birth or childhood

Follow-up with a physician is critical for babies at risk as it is possible that they may pass a hearing screening at birth but will still need more testing later.

New parents, says Shappell, should be sure to talk to their baby’s doctor and make an appointment with a pediatric audiologist or hearing specialist for further testing.

Normal milestones for the first year:

By 2 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Quiet when hearing a familiar voice
  • Make sounds like ahh and ohh

By 4 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Look for sounds with his eyes
  • Make sounds like squeals, whimpers or chuckles

By 6 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Turn his head toward a sound
  • Make sounds like ba-ba, ma-ma, da-da

By 9 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Imitate speech sounds made by others
  • Understand no-no or bye-bye
  • Turn his head toward a soft sound

By 12 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Correctly use ma-ma or da-da
  • Respond to singing or music

Still, it is important to remember that babies with mild hearing loss may also be able to do these things.

During the second year, parents should continue to monitor any changes in a child’s development.

Candice L. Grotsky, Au.D., a Cigna audiologist who practices at the Stapley Hearing Center in Mesa, says that by twelve months to two years, children should still be turning to sounds from either side and “look up or down” for a sound if it comes above or below them.

They get better at  “localizing” or turning directly to a sound the older they get assuming hearing is normal and there are no developmental delays,  she adds.

Grotsky says that in toddlers, hearing loss is often caused by ear infections.  She says that most parents seem to know “when something is wrong” and bring their child in for testing.

“Maybe speech is delayed or mushy sounding, maybe speech was progressing well and all of a sudden stopped or regressed,” she says. ” Sometimes the child doesn’t respond if you are behind them and make a sound or noise.  These are all clues that hearing loss could be present.”

Grotsky says that most of those children in the age range of 2-4 years that she sees are coming in for the first time  — and it is usually a speech delay that prompts parents to seek testing.

If you suspect for any reason that your child — at any age — is having difficulty hearing or seems to be delayed in speech or in any other area, talk to your child’s physician.

Rates of hospitalization for drowning decline

In the U.S., drowning accounts for nearly 1,100 deaths of children aged 1 to 19 years each year.

That makes it the second leading cause of unintentional injury death in this age group.

But not every drowning results in fatality. Some children survive a drowning…but doesn’t always mean a full recovery for the victim.

Lesia Crawford, of Phoenix, tells the story of how her younger brother, Andrew Hill, survived after falling in to a swimming pool- and what his life is like now, many years later.

For every pediatric drowning death, another two children are hospitalized after nonfatal drowning injuries.

And in Arizona, warm weather, long summers, and thousands of residential swimming pools that do not need to be drained in winter contribute to tragic water-related accidents among young children.

But there is good news.

Research results that will be released in the February 2012 issue of Pediatrics (published online Jan. 16), found rates of pediatric hospitalizations associated with drowning actually declined 49 percent during the study period, from 4.7 hospitalizations per 100,000, to 2.4 per 100,000.

The hospitalization rate for boys remained consistently higher than the rate for girls, though rates declined for all age groups and for both males and females.

Hospitalization rates decreased across all geographic regions of the U.S., with the greatest decline occurring in southern states.

The American Association of Pediatrics (check out their re-designed website) says that the study offers benchmarks that can be used to judge future efforts in drowning prevention and to target interventions to high-risk areas.