Tag Archives: Cardon Children’s Medical Center

Bike safety rodeo this Saturday, March 31

Every three days a child in the United States is killed while riding a bicycle. Every single day, 100 children are treated in emergency rooms for bicycle-related head injuries.

Proper helmet use reduces the risk of brain injury from these accidents by about 90 percent.

Why don’t more kids wear helmets? For some, it’s the cool factor. For others, it’s the expense.

This weekend, Cardon Children’s Medical Center along with Safe Kids Maricopa County will give away free helmets to the first 300 people to attend their Bike Rodeo.

It’s a chance to practice bike safety skills and to find out more about helmet use. Plus, there’s an opportunity to win a new bike.

More on how to fit a bike helmet

Cardon Children’s Bike Rodeo details:

  • Saturday, March 31
  • 9 a.m. to noon
  • Cardon Children’s Medical Center
  • 1400 S. Dobson Road, Mesa 85202
  • For ages 3-16
  • Bring your bike or scooter

Watch  injury prevention specialist Tracey Fejt, RN, of Cardon Children’s talk about an outreach program she designed that provides safety curriculum and free helmets to schools that agree to “helmet required” policies for students.

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Car seat safety check this Saturday

Wondering if your car seat still fits your child? Confused about when to turn your child from rear-facing to front facing? Need the eye of a trained professional car seat fitter to make sure your safety system works the way it should?

On Saturday, March 24, the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety Car Seat Check Event takes place at the Target store located at  1525 W. Power Road in Mesa.

Cardon Children’s Medical Center Safety and Injury Prevention staff will have 100 car seats to give out to families who need one.

Four out of five car seats are used incorrectly, according to the American Automobile Association. Don’t make these tragic mistakes!

Families can have a child’s car seat recertified, learn how to install a seat correctly or get a free car seat.

More RAK Resources on vehicle safety seats

Watch this video to see what a safety check event looks like:

 

Snoring linked to behavior problems in children

Children who snore or who have other sleep-related breathing problems are more likely to have behavioral problems years later, says a new study to be published in the April 2012 issue of Pediatrics.

Researchers asked a group of parents about their children’s snoring, mouth breathing, observed apnea and behavior, starting at age 6 months and then periodically until age 7 years.

By age 4, the children with sleep-disordered breathing were 20 percent to 60 percent more likely to have behavioral difficulties. By age 7, the likelihood jumped to 40 to 100 percent.

The worst symptoms were associated with the worst behavioral outcomes, meaning that the kids who faced more serious sleep-related breathing problems also tended to be more likely to struggle with behavior issues.

Study authors conclude that sleep-disordered breathing early in life can have a strong effect on behavior later in childhood.

Kids who have these difficulties may miss out on critical periods of brain development that researchers believe take place during deep sleep.

The study findings suggest that these symptoms may require attention as early as the first year of life.

Dr. Mark Brown, pediatric pulmonologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, and a member of the Arizona Chapter of the AAP, weighs in on kids and snoring:

 When should a parent be concerned about snoring?

  •  When a child can be heard snoring outside of their room.
  • When a child has disrupted sleep with short “pauses, snorts, or gasps” in their sleep.
  • If the child is having behavioral problems, a short attention span and problems at school.
  • If the child, especially an older child, frequently falls asleep during the day (i.e. in the car, during a TV show or movie, while reading).
  • In severe cases, there can be difficulty with weight gain or obesity, or high blood pressure.

Is a little light snoring okay?

Light snoring without any of the above associated signs/symptoms may be “normal.” If there is any concern, the parent should consult with their child’s primary care physician.

How do you know when snoring needs medical attention?

 If any of the above signs/symptoms are seen or if the parent is unsure about the significance of their child’s snoring they should consult with their child’s primary care physician.

RAK Archives: More on the consequences of too little sleep, and what families can do about it.

RAK Resources on respiratory issues: Take a Deep Breath by Dr. Nina Shapiro

Find out what technicians at the Sleep Center at Cardon Children’s Medical Center learn by watching children sleep:


Play ball — but protect young athletes from overuse injuries

The rates of injury for baseball and softball are relatively low compared to other sports, but the degree of injury severity is relatively high.

To protect young athletes, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that qualified adults instruct kids on proper throwing mechanics, training and conditioning.

Adults need to encourage athletes to stop playing and seek treatment when signs of overuse injuries arise.

Dr. Mike Perlstein, AzAAP board of directors member, says that over the past 20 years, the range of sports available through schools and through city recreational departments for children of all ages to participate in has grown.

But as the opportunities for playing sports has increased, so has the perceived competitive level.  Often, says Perlstein, the difference between a select or competitive team and the corresponding recreational team has been blurred.

And as the competitive nature of sports has heated up, the pressure applied by coaches and/or parents to succeed can be stifling.

In reality, an extremely small percentage of student athletes continue participating in competitive sports through high school, college, and beyond, Perlstein says.

So, parents should take a step back and think about what else young athletes can learn from participating in sports. “ I feel the lessons involved in competition are important for kids to learn,” he adds, “but should be secondary to the more important in lessons of having fun and exercising.

Perlstein, who practices at  Palo Verde Pediatrics in Gilbert, recommends that patients and their families avoid hyper specializing in any given sport until at least age 12.  “Experiencing a broad range of sporting activities, and developing different skill sets focusing on different muscle groups, is very important.”

Perlstein says that helps kids to develop in to well-rounded athletes and avoid overuse injuries. Which is important at any age — but especially in those younger athletes who have not yet reached puberty.

Overuse injuries, by definition, are almost all preventable, according to Perlstein. And the list of significant injuries documented in today’s young athletes continues to grow.

That is a source of frustration, he adds, because many of these injuries could be minimized or prevented with appropriate training strategies.

“Physical stresses on the pre-pubertal body need to be managed differently than in an athlete with a fully mature body,” he says. “For example, I do not recommend weight training with free weights until the student athlete is well into pubertal development.”

Repetitive activities, especially in relation to the upper arm, such as involved in tennis, swimming, and baseball/softball  need to be managed closely.  “Student athletes, their coaches, and their families all need to listen to the student athlete and for potential signs or symptoms of possible evolving overuse injuries.”

Have a young athlete with a single sport interest? Here are Perlstein’s recommendations:

  • Make sure the child continues to enjoy the activity, and is not simply feeling the pressure to continue.
  •  Spend intermittent time away from the sport to allow their body time to heal and to “re-charge their battery”.
  • Follow up with a sports medicine trained staff to watch for evidence of physical stress or imbalance in their flexibility or strength to avoid overuse injuries.

Not everyone may know exactly when an athlete begins to show signs of overuse, says Stephen Rice, MD, FAAP, a co-author of the AAP policy statement. “But it is important to know to never pitch when one’s arm is tired or sore. Athletes must respect the limits imposed on throwing, including pitch counts and rest periods.”

Additional AAP recommendations for young athletes include:

  • All players should wear appropriate protective gear to avoid injury. Polycarbonate eye protection or metal cages on helmets should be worn when batting.
  • Coaches should be prepared to call 911 and have rapid access to an automated external defibrillator if a player experiences cardiac arrest or related medical condition.
  • All coaches and officials should be aware of extreme weather conditions (heat, lightning) and postpone or cancel games if conditions worsen and players are at risk.
  • Not all children will develop at the same rate, so repeated instruction and practice are essential for young baseball and softball players to acquire basic skills when learning the fundamentals of the game.

RAK Archives:

Strength training for teens

Twitter chat with Cardon Children’s Medical Center sports medicine specialist Udall Hunt, MD

What you can learn from training the best: A conversation with veteran strength and conditioning coach Tim McClellan

First Friday art show features work of Cardon Children’s patients

For young hospitalized patients, a chance to color, paint or draw can be a powerful tool.

As a Child Life assistant at Cardon Children’s Medical Center, Julie Anich works with kids in the art room on a regular basis.

Maria, age 8

“I really feel that the art, no matter what the diagnosis, is very relaxing for them. It’s like magic, in a sense – art is always an escape where kids could go to a place other than a hospital room and be a normal kid, even if it is just for an hour.”

 

Karla, age 8

Young Arts Arizona Ltd., will publicly exhibit the artwork of hospitalized kids from Cardon Children’s beginning this Friday, March 2, at the Purple Space gallery in downtown Phoenix.

Dena, age 10

The exhibit will also feature art created by children who are at risk due to learning challenges, economic conditions or difficult family circumstances.

Young Arts collaborates with 56 schools and agencies whose children create the art that is exhibited in publicly accessible buildings. For organizations with no art program in place, Young Arts conducts art workshops with a qualified teaching artist.

Amber, age 12

The community outreach that Young Arts strives to do is extensive; they exhibit children’s art in 24 public galleries all over Metro Phoenix and in Tucson, making art widely accessible to a huge audience.  More than 12 million people have seen over 16,000 pieces of children’s art since Young Arts’ inception in 1999.

The exhibit is open to the public but if you want to attend the gallery dedication, an RSVP is recommended.

Details:

The Art of Healing

Friday, March 2, 5:30-7 PM  at Purple Space Gallery, 2009 N 7th Street, Phoenix

Young Arts Arizona will dedicate the hall gallery at Purple Space to Valley philanthropist L. Roy Papp. Refreshments will be served.

The Purple Space Gallery is on the First Friday shuttle route.

RSVP for the dedication: 602-852-3605 or youngartsaz@gmail.com

Hearing loss in newborns and toddlers: when to worry

According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, approximately 300 newborns each year in the state have an inherited disorder that could be identified through screening.

Hearing loss is the most common of these disorders.

Babies born in hospitals are screened for hearing loss within the first few hours after birth.

Watch a newborn hearing screening at Cardon Children’s Medical Center/Banner Desert Medical Center

If a baby doesn’t pass the initial test, parents need to make sure they return for a repeat screening two to four weeks later, says Patty Shappell, AuD., CCC-A, an audiologist with Neonatology Associates, Ltd.

“Parents may get home and think the baby is responding normally, says Shappell, “but they still need to have a follow-up evaluation to assess hearing and rule out even mild or unilateral hearing loss.”

What happens if screening results are not within the normal range? Read about Brooke Gammie’s journey after her daughter, Payton, did not pass her newborn hearing screening.

For babies born outside of a hospital, screenings are available at outpatient clinics such as Neonatal Associates. Most insurance companies, including AHCCCS, cover the costs of the screenings.

What do babies miss if they are born with even a mild hearing loss? Hearing acuity directly affects the development of speech and verbal language skills. A baby with hearing loss, even during the first year, can be short-changed in his or her social, emotional, cognitive and academic development.

Diagnosis and early intervention are critical during the first year for the child with any degree of loss.

 How do you know if your baby is at risk for hearing loss?

Risk factors for hearing loss, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services include:

  • Babies who stay in the NICU for more than 5 days
  • Babies who have had an infection before or after birth such as CMV, herpes, rubella or meningitis
  • Babies who have a family member with hearing loss from birth or childhood

Follow-up with a physician is critical for babies at risk as it is possible that they may pass a hearing screening at birth but will still need more testing later.

New parents, says Shappell, should be sure to talk to their baby’s doctor and make an appointment with a pediatric audiologist or hearing specialist for further testing.

Normal milestones for the first year:

By 2 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Quiet when hearing a familiar voice
  • Make sounds like ahh and ohh

By 4 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Look for sounds with his eyes
  • Make sounds like squeals, whimpers or chuckles

By 6 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Turn his head toward a sound
  • Make sounds like ba-ba, ma-ma, da-da

By 9 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Imitate speech sounds made by others
  • Understand no-no or bye-bye
  • Turn his head toward a soft sound

By 12 months of age a baby with normal hearing should be able to:

  • Correctly use ma-ma or da-da
  • Respond to singing or music

Still, it is important to remember that babies with mild hearing loss may also be able to do these things.

During the second year, parents should continue to monitor any changes in a child’s development.

Candice L. Grotsky, Au.D., a Cigna audiologist who practices at the Stapley Hearing Center in Mesa, says that by twelve months to two years, children should still be turning to sounds from either side and “look up or down” for a sound if it comes above or below them.

They get better at  “localizing” or turning directly to a sound the older they get assuming hearing is normal and there are no developmental delays,  she adds.

Grotsky says that in toddlers, hearing loss is often caused by ear infections.  She says that most parents seem to know “when something is wrong” and bring their child in for testing.

“Maybe speech is delayed or mushy sounding, maybe speech was progressing well and all of a sudden stopped or regressed,” she says. ” Sometimes the child doesn’t respond if you are behind them and make a sound or noise.  These are all clues that hearing loss could be present.”

Grotsky says that most of those children in the age range of 2-4 years that she sees are coming in for the first time  — and it is usually a speech delay that prompts parents to seek testing.

If you suspect for any reason that your child — at any age — is having difficulty hearing or seems to be delayed in speech or in any other area, talk to your child’s physician.

Raising Arizona Kids Safety Seat Resource page

Here’s a list of where to get help around the Valley for car seat safety checks, recalls, and other information on how to keep babies, toddlers, and older kids safe in vehicles.

Know of resources we’ve missed? Use the comments section and we’ll add to our list once we verify your suggestion. Thanks!

Hospitals

Cardon Children’s Medical Center Car Seat Safety Tips and email contact information for parents with questions

Phoenix Children’s Hospital Injury Prevention features the Car Seat Helper App; also more on their Kids Ride Safe program

AAA Arizona offers assistance from certified car seat technicians. Contact the AAA Traffic Safety Educator to schedule an appointment

National Highway and Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA) car seat safety inspection stations in the Greater Phoenix area

Valley Fire Departments: Links to individual station web site pages on car seat inspection and safety checks. Call first to make sure a certified technician will be on site:

Avondale Fire Department

Chandler Fire Department

Gilbert Fire Department

Mesa Fire Department

Peoria Fire Department

Phoenix Fire Department

Scottsdale Fire Department

Surprise Fire Department

Tolleson Fire Department

National Highway Traffic and Safety Association has the latest car seat recommendations for kids and updates on state-by-state laws

Safe Kids USA features research on car seats and placement and motor vehicle safety facts sheets.